Decoding your targeted audience

Target Marketing

January, 2017—

No two customers are alike. That’s why the right message to the right customer is so important to your store’s success.

The best marketing campaigns resonate emotionally with a targeted audience. When we plan events for our clients, we have to understand the mindset of the consumer who will best identify with our client’s brand so we craft a message that speaks directly to their needs. To do this, we send information about existing customers to a market analytics company called Claritas, Inc. Each client then receives a detailed account of the five demographic groups that have purchased from them in the past and are most likely to buy from them in the future. It’s our job to determine what each demographic group wants most from their furniture store so we can then demonstrate that our client can fulfill their target audience’s needs.

Here are a few example demographic groups your store can target with specific marketing messages. If done successfully, you’ll gain their business and potentially the business of everyone in their friend circle (virtual or otherwise).

Mid-life Success (median household income: $69,500) This demographic consists of mostly childless singles or couples in their 30s and 40s. With college educations and professional jobs, these people represent the most affluent of the younger demographics. They enjoy the latest technologies, travel, exercise, and urban or suburban settings. When shopping for furniture, people in the mid-life success demographic are willing to spend more money if they feel they’re getting a better value. They like quality products with high performance, but they do their research to make sure they’re getting the lowest price. Design and style are important to them.

Mainstream Families (median household income: $58,000) Combining both middle-class and working-class families, mainstream families live in modestly priced homes in smaller towns. They enjoy outdoor activities like camping and sports, and they also enjoy televised media with their families. This market segment shops for furniture that’s modestly priced and easy to mix and match. When it comes to style, they enjoy simple beauty and classic designs (think lots of neutrals and simple patterns). Since many still have young children, long-lasting and easy-to-clean fabrics are a plus.

Young Achievers (median household income: $37,000) Found mostly in urban and metro neighborhoods, young achievers can be singles just starting out on their own or new families who either rent or own new homes. Although they have a lower household income than their older counterparts, young achievers have a firm grasp of the latest technologies and social media. They will use the internet to research prices and to compare product reviews. Since many may have recently graduated or entered the workforce, complete room packages may appeal to them (especially if they can get an added discount). While style is important to them, they are more interested in getting more furniture for their money at this point in their life.

Affluent Empty Nest (median household income: $91,500) Wealthy Americans over 45 years of age who hold executive positions and no longer raise young children can be categorized as affluent empty nesters. They have disposable income as well as large, older homes in the suburbs. People in this demographic often want to purchase furniture that will express a more polished style, and they’re willing to spend more money to achieve the look they desire. They also may be looking to downsize to smaller condos and homes, so they might need smaller furniture that will still maintain an upscale look to fit. Furniture stores with extensive design services and quality brands will appeal to this type of consumer.

About the Author

KevinDoran
Kevin Doran is CEO of R&A Marketing, a full service-advertising agency focused on helping the independent furniture retailer. He can be reached at kevin@ramarketing.com.